Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2004

Keywords

African-Americans; Housing; Baltimore; Maryland; Segregation; 14th Amendment; Constitutional Law

Abstract

In 1936, Edmond D. Meade, an African-American pastor at Israel Baptist Church in Baltimore, contracted to purchase a home in an almost exclusively white block of Baltimore City. Meade’s purchase was followed by a suit by the white residents to block the use of the home by the new buyers. This work examines the legacy of Meade v. Dennistone, the effect of the decision on “free market forces” and concludes by considering the impact of the decision – and the community response – on the final judicial rejection of the “separate but equal” treatment of the races.

Recommended Citation

63 Maryland Law Review 773 (2004).

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